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Mike Nelson, An Invocation: Five Hundred and Thirty Books Southend Central Library, 2013

Mike Nelson’s An Invocation: Five Hundred and Thirty Books Southend Central Library (2013) is a permanent commission installed at the contemporary Focal Point Gallery (FPG) in Southend-on-Sea, England; it has reversed the usual spectacular tropes of public monuments.1 The artist inserted a carefully-selected series of publications into a cavity within the new gallery’s wall to create a work that references the ideological setting within which each building was created. [more]



Seth Siegelaub, Carl Andre, Robert Barry, Douglas Huebler, Joseph Kosuth, Sol LeWitt, Robert Morris, Lawrence Weiner, AKA the Xerox Book, New York, 1968

A well-known example of a book as exhibition is the catalogue published in 1968 by Seth Siegelaub, which was the sole site for exhibitions of conceptual artists. No other exhibitions took place; thus, this was not a situation in which a book served as a catalogue. Instead, the book publication was the exhibition as it was record and site of the conceptual undertaking. The untitled work, commonly known as the [Xerox Book] (1968) ) included the works of seven artists: Carl Andre, Robert Barry, Douglas Huebler, Joseph Kosuth, Sol LeWitt, Robert Morris, and Lawrence Weiner. [more]
 


Mel Bochner, Working Drawings and Other Visible Things on Paper Not Necessarily Meant to be Viewed as Art, School of the Visual Arts, 1966

In 1966, Mel Bochner, then-young instructor at the School of Visual Arts in New York was asked to organize a “Christmas show on drawings,” to run from December 2–23, 1966. Bochner asked artist he liked (such as Donald Judd, Carl Andre, Dan Flavin, Sol LeWitt, Eva Hesse, Dan Graham, Jo Baer, Robert Moskowitz, Robert Smithson, Al Jensen, to name a few) for drawings that weren’t necessarily “work[s] of art.”1 [more]